Monday, 01 August 2016 10:05

Clinical Evaluation After Peripheral Nerve Repair With Caprolactone Neurotube

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Abstract

  • Background: Peripheral nerve injuries with substance loss are challenges to surgeons because direct suture repair may result in malfunction due to nerve suture tension. Autologous nerve grafts are alternatives for treating those lesions; however, harvesting grafts adds morbidity at donor sites. Synthetic substitutes are options to bridge the gaps in these situations. The caprolactone neurotubes are used to assist nerve regeneration, but the literature lacks studies that evaluate their results. Methods: This research was designed to clinically evaluate patients undergoing repair of peripheral nerves with that conduit. We described results of 12 case series consisting of operations with Neurolac┬«. All nerves severed were sensory and had small gaps (ie, less than 25 mm). Subjective and objective clinical evaluations were performed and registered. Results: Physical examination by monofilament testing and 2-point discrimination showed results rated as good or excellent. However, the patients had complaints regarding sensory changes. Conclusions: Synthetic bioabsorbable guides for nerve repair are promising. The caprolactone conduits were demonstrated to be a safe option treatment and with a simple technique. Although in our study there were some operative complications, they were in line with previous descriptions in the literature. This case series added information about the treatment prognosis, but a higher evidence level study is necessary for decision making.

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